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Welcome to Mediapolis Veterinary Clinic
Your Veterinarian in Mediapolis IA
Call us at (319) 394-3108

Are you a current client with a pet emergency? Call us right away at (319) 394-3108!

If you live in Mediapolis or the surrounding area and need a trusted veterinarian to care for your pets – look no further. Dr. Wendy Thomas and Dr. Seth Hartter are licensed IA veterinarians, treating all types of pets. Your pets’ health and well being are very important to us, and we take every possible measure to give your animals the care they deserve.

Mediapolis Veterinary Clinic is a full-service animal hospital and welcomes both emergency treatment cases as well as pet patients in need of routine medical, surgical, and dental care. Dr. Wendy Thomas and Dr. Seth Hartter have years of experience treating serious conditions and offering regular pet wellness care. Beyond first-rate pet care, we make our clinic comfortable, kid-friendly, and calm, so your pet can relax in the waiting room and look forward to meeting our Mediapolis veterinarian.

We are happy to offer a number of resources that enable you to learn about how to take better care of your pets. Please feel free to browse our site, particularly the informational articles. The best veterinary care for animals is ongoing nutrition and problem prevention, so becoming knowledgeable about preventative pet care is essential to the ongoing success of your animal’s health. If you have any questions, call (319) 394-3108 or email us and we'll promptly get back to you. Our Mediapolis veterinary office is very easy to get to -- just check out the map below! We also welcome you to subscribe to our newsletter, which is created especially for Mediapolis pet owners.

At Mediapolis Veterinary Clinic, we treat your pets like the valued family members they are.


Dr. Wendy Thomas

Dr. Seth Hartter

Mediapolis Veterinarian | Mediapolis Veterinary Clinic | (319) 394-3108

114 Wapello St. S
Mediapolis, IA 52637

Farm calls

We provide on-site care for cattle, pigs, sheep, goats, and horses within our service area. We have a transportable chute to assist with cattle calls.

Emergency care

We provide after-hours emergency care for our patients. Please call (319) 394-3108 to obtain the on-call number. We share emergency care with another clinic in the area so you may be instructed to call their number if it is their night to cover our calls. At this time we are unable to provide emergency care for non-clients (other than the clinic we share call with) because of the large number of calls we receive.

Testimonials

Read What Our Clients Say

  • "Great place great people"
    Aaron P.
  • "Our cat loves this doctor. He is amazing"
    Patty W.
  • "Great people !"
    COBRA one
  • "Great service"
    Dianna B.

Featured Articles

Read about interesting topics

  • Dentistry

    Dentistry for Horses Like people, horses can develop dental problems. Also like people, some horses can be stoic in the face of major dental pain while a minor dental issue may compromise the performance of a more sensitive horse. This is why horses need regular exams to maximize their dental health. Foals ...

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  • Degenerative Problems

    Degenerative disorders are conditions that worsen over time. Some can be improved, or at least slowed, if caught early on. Here are a few common degenerative conditions that horses may face. Myelopathy Myelopathy is also called wobbler syndrome because of the affected horse’s unstable gait. This ...

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  • Cushing's Disease (PPID)

    Cushing’s disease (also known as pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction, or PPID) is the most common disease affecting the endocrine system of horses. This group of glands produces hormones that help keep the body in balance. With Cushing’s disease, an imbalance of these hormones causes several symptoms, ...

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  • Cryptochidism

    Cryptorchidism is a condition in which one or both testicles fail to descend into the scrotum. This is the most common problem affecting the sexual development of male horses. If both of the testicles remain in the abdomen, the horse will be sterile. Horses with an undescended testicle are sometimes ...

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  • Congential Defects and Disorders

    Horses with congenital disorders are born with physical or physiological abnormalities. These may be readily apparent, or may be diagnosed as the foal matures. Unfortunately, the list of possible congenital deformities is long. These anomalies may affect the heart, ears, eyes or skin. The autoimmune, ...

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  • Caring for Your Horse

    Horse owners form a special bond with their horses, but this close connection comes with the responsibility of caring for your equine companion throughout its life. This means taking care of your horse every day throughout the year, come rain or shine. If you do this well, your horse can live up to ...

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  • Cancer in Horses

    While cancer is not as prevalent in horses as it is in humans, horses do get several types of this disease. Here are a few of the common types of cancer that a horse might develop. Melanoma Gray horses over the age of 15 are the likeliest candidates to get melanoma. Melanoma tumors originate from cells ...

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  • Bucked Shins

    Bucked shins is the common name for very small fractures on the front part (periosteum) of a horse’s cannon bones. These bones are on the lower part of the leg, and run between the knee and the fetlock joint below. Symptoms of Bucked Shins Bucked shins are more common in 2- to 3-year-old Thoroughbreds ...

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  • Breeding

    Breeding horses is a complicated topic, but this quick overview will provide you with enough information to talk with a breeder or your veterinarian about breeding your horse. Role of the Stallion A stallion is a male horse that has not been castrated. The stallion’s role in breeding is to provide ...

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  • Barns to Pastureland

    If you are to get the best from your horse, it is vital that you provide him with a happy, comfortable and safe home environment. This applies whether he is kept in a horse barn or in a field. As a general rule, a particularly fine-coated horse, or one that is in hard work, needs to be stabled during ...

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